How strong is a thunderstorm? -asked Jessica (8)

thunderclouds

Many thanks for your comments team. Yes you are right, to create a thunderstorm you need a lot of warm water. It’s development goes by the following crude set of stages …

  • Lots of warm water evaporates (turns from a liquid state into a gaseous state.). Thunderstorms are therefore more common in the warmer regions of our planet.
  • The gaseous water is forced upwards by the warm sea. The warm sea warms the air close to it. This air expands and is therefore becomes ‘lighter’ and moves upwards carrying the water vapour (water vapour is the term used to describe gaseous water) with it.
  • As the gaseous water rises it gets colder (more distant from the warm sea) so it becomes water again (small drops of liquid water). A cloud begins to form.
  • The heat from the ocean continues to make the water and water vapour(clouds) rise.
  • It gets even colder and more of the water vapour turns back to water.
  • Some of the water droplets in the cloud turn into ice particles.
  • The ice particles separate some move to the top of the cloud others remain in the bottom.
  • This split causes an uneven distribution of electrical charge in the cloud.
  • The result is Lightning and Thunder.
  • Some of the frozen water falls away from the cloud. this causes all sorts of down draughts and strong winds are created.
  • Some of the ice does not melt as it falls through the air – this forms hailstones.

You could look at this question http://www.sciencemaster.co.uk/2016/11/18/elizabeth-9-asked-a-question-on-lightning/

 

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